Monday, February 23, 2015

The future is here and.... nooooooooo!

So, today, for the first time ever, I saw someone out in the lineup PULL THEIR iPHONE OUT OF THEIR BOARDSHORTS AND CHECK THEIR MESSAGES! Not voicemail, but texts or emails or social media or the swell report or something.

Say what now?

He never took a photo, never took a call, but while I was out there I saw him check his phone a few times and it totally bummed me out.

I'm guessing that people using their mobiles in the water is going to increasingly become a thing, and I've been sadly trying to comes to some kind of terms with it for a while because one of the things that I really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really love about surfing is that it's forced time away from that stuff. Like flying where you can could just sit back and do other things because you can't couldn't check your emails. It's like when I go for an after-work walk and don't take my phone unless I want to take pictures. I have a separate iPod so I can have tunes without my phone for that very reason.

I love that when I paddle out it's just people and the sea (and Go-pros now I guess). People sitting quietly alone or with others. Or (if I'm around) people talking and laughing with friend with no distractions other than waves or a turtle or a bird or (again, if I'm around) a cool-looking cloud. The idea that folk will have their heads down checking messages or posting to Instagram or doing anything that isn't paying attention to the incredible beauty and thrill of being in the sea and under the sky is so heinous that it makes me feel SAD IN MY HEART.

When I saw this guy, head down, scrolling through his screen I wanted to paddle over and say, 'Sir, I'm judging you right now. Judging. You.' Because I was. But I didn't. I just silently judged him, emitted one of those internal, existential screams that tear at your soul every now and again, and took a deep breath.

And then I caught a bunch of really long, fun waves and got caught on the inside by a massive set and was wrenched around by the ocean and felt awesome!

Friday, February 13, 2015

Women who run with the tides

When it comes to talking about improving the visibility, representation and opportunities for women in surfing, one of the common points made is that 'Women need more role models'. And it's a fair point. Until recently, only the most high-performance, most successful and/or prettiest female surfers were given media coverage, with others left out because they're 'not good enough' or 'too butch'. Of course, historically the people making those comments and value judgements (How does being 'butch' impact a woman's surfing abilities or value? And what does it matter if someone is 'butch' anyway?) have largely been male magazine editors and marketing directors. These days we have a lot more women in all sorts of roles in surf media and representations of women have improved, all of which is awesome, but there is still an alarming emphasis on youth, beauty and sex appeal.

For younger women I think the high-performance, everyone's-gorgeous, role-model issue remains an especially important area of concern, so those conversations and changes need to continue. But for women who are older the whole role model thing is interesting in a different way because there is an assumption that most people find role models in high-performance or competitive surfing, which isn't always true.When I talk to my friends about surfing aspirations or improvements, they rarely refer to professional surfers. In fact, almost never. Instead, they refer to women from their own community, who manage to surf as well as have a career, a relationship and/or kids. Body image and fashion tend to make way for other issues, and often it is the older, more experienced women that get mentioned as models (or not) of how things can be done - of what to aspire to. 

All of this is (as ever) a long way of coming to a film I have been wanting to share here for a long time, 'Women Who Run With the Tides', by Michelle Shearer. And I apologise for not posting it earlier because it's an important film and a really great one as well.  


This short film was shot in Lennox Head, Australia, just down the road from my home digs in Suffolk Park. It focuses on three women - Marg, 64, Sally, 58 and Carol, 50 - who have different surfing histories, ability levels and life situations, but who all share a passion for being in the sea as often as possible. These are the kinds of stories that are common when it comes to tales about men. These stories are important in local, regional and national understandings of surfing, because they contribute to how we remember what happened, who was participating, and what things were like at any one time, but they also have resonance in representing what is possible for various people. As men from surfing's boom period of the 1950s and 60s have aged, their stories have continued to be represented, thus showing it is possible to surf past youth, into middle-age and beyond. But as women struggle to have their most successful surfers make it into the media, older, less skilled women have had no space at all! And this does have repercussions. One friend of mine who is in her 50s told me that she worries about getting older because she becomes increasingly invisible in the surf. The older guys get positioned as 'local legends' with space made for them to get waves. Not always, but it certainly happens. Yet women don't seem to be treated the same way. This friend has been surfing her home break for over 20 years, but these days she's yelled at and dropped in on by young men just arrived to town - men who surf with far less skill and grace, and with much less knowledge of the break itself. 

Michelle's film is a beautiful example of how significant ordinary, everyday role models are for people and for our culture, and after this film was release I know many women had conversations about the women in their community who they look up to. In my own surfing life, I'm really lucky because I have many women I can look up to in the surf. Some of them are friends of mine, some of them I just know them from the surf, but they all provide an example of what it might look like for me to keep surfing as I age. Not only that it is possible to do so, but the compromises I might make, the ways I might be able to continue contributing to my surfing community, and how I might be able to continue doing that in my own style and on my own terms. 

Legends. 

The 'Women Who Run With the Tides' Fcebook page has info on upcoming screenings as well as a way to contact Michelle if you would like.